Showcasing Excellence in Graduate Student Research at Laurier

Researchers-of-Laurier-Logo

Congratulations to our Researcher of Laurier 2014 winner Dave Whiteside, and runner up Bharati Sethi. They both received cash prizes from the Faculty of Graduate Studies and the GSA, and exclusive professional development packages coordinated by the Laurier Research Office.

Be sure to get your applications in for the next round for your chance to be selected as a Researcher of the Month with automatic entry into the Researcher of Laurier 2015 competition.


Submit an application for yourself, or nominate a Laurier graduate student, to be recognized for an exceptional research program! The GSA will be showcasing a difference graduate student every month, and all of the successful Researchers of Laurier will be eligible for an award at the conclusion of the Winter term.

This program will be carried out in collaboration with Laurier departments, but is focused on graduate students being honoured by their colleagues and community.

Please download the application form & send your nomination to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

> Application Form

> Letter to Students re: Researchers of Laurier

March Winner - Moniruzzaman Mohammad

RoL Winner Slider-MONIRUZZAMAN

Congratulations to Moniruzzaman Mohammad, our March researcher!

Mohammad Moniruzzaman is a PhD candidate in the WLU-UW joint program in Geography and Environmental Studies. His professional and academic background is multidisciplinary in nature and spans across the disciplines of Public Policy, Economics, Geography and Environmental Studies. His doctoral work investigates the connections between migration and food security, an area relatively unexplored until recently with particular attention to the impact of transnational migrants’ remittances on households’ food and nutritional security outcomes. Recently migrants’ remittance has reshaped the landscape of global financial flows to become three times as large as official aid and almost as large as total foreign direct investment (FDI) flows to developing countries. Using household survey data from Bangladesh, his research shows remittances improve the recipient households’ economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food. Moreover, increased purchasing power improves the dietary diversity allowing households to be better able to withstand food related shocks including sudden increase in food prices.  Moniruzzaman has an outstanding record of receiving fellowship and award which includes the Netherlands Fellowship (NFP), Asian Development Bank-Japan Scholarship (ADB-JSP), Endeavour International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (IPRS) in Australia, Ontario Graduate Scholarship (OGS) and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) doctoral fellowship in Canada; his work has also been presented at a number of international conferences.

February Winner -Abdus Sabur

Abdus Sabur

Congratulations to Abdus Sabur, our February researcher!

The theme of Sabur’s MSc research is to conduct fundamental science experiments on how organo-arsenic compounds of environmental relevance interact with reactive components in soil, particularly iron (oxyhydr)oxides.  Arsenic is released to the environment mainly from natural sources intensified by anthropogenic activities. Due to its varying toxicity, it is essential to know of its interaction with environmental surfaces for risk assessment and cleanup efforts.  The main objective was to extract kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that will aid in building accurate mathematical models to be used in predicting the fate of arsenic compounds and in designing arsenic removal technologies.  Sabur’s MSc committee concluded that he produced outstanding data from his experiments that is pushing the boundaries of knowledge in field of geochemistry.

January Winner - Maria Liegghio

RoL Winner Slider-Carolyn Leckie

Congratulations to Maria Liegghio, our January researcher!

Maria is a PhD student in the Faculty of Social Work and her research is focused on the stigma of mental illness and child and youth mental health. Using a participatory research approach, Maria worked collaboratively with a group of youth diagnosed with a mental health issue to assist in three initiatives: the development of a national youth survey on stigma; an analysis of the ways young people living with a “mental illness” are portrayed in popular media; and a photo-voice project that explored what “normal” mental health was in children and youth.  As well, she interviewed parents and younger siblings about their stigma experiences as family members.  Funded by the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the results will be used to inform policy and program initiatives aimed at improving the mental health system across Canada.


December Winner - Dave Whiteside

RoL Winner Slider-Dave WhitesideCongratulations to Dave Whiteside, our December researcher!

Dave Whiteside is currently completing his PhD in Organizational Behaviour through the School of Business & Economics. His SSHRC-funded research focuses on identifying the factors that lead to unfair behaviour in the workplace. Specifically, his dissertation examines how and why ego depletion (i.e., the depletion of cognitive resources required for effective self-control) can lead to managers treating others unfairly in organizations, even when they believe that they should be fair. Overall, results indicate that depleted managers engage in significantly lower levels of fairness than non-depleted managers but raising managers’ awareness of the potential fairness deficits in their behaviour can provide an effective intervention to minimize these depletion effects. Dave’s research has been published in Journal of Business Ethics and Research in Social Issues in Management and won the Best Master’s Thesis Award from the Human Resources Research Institute (HRRI).

October Winner - Bharati Sethi

RoL Winner Slider-Bharati SethiCongratulations to Bharati Sethi, our October researcher!

Bharati Sethi is currently completing her PhD in Community, Planning, Policy, and Organisation at the Faculty of Social Work. In 2012 she was nominated for the ‘Top 25 immigrants to Canada’ and was honored as Laurier’s 100 Alumni of Achievement. She is also the recipient of several prestigious scholarships. She came to Canada as a migrant from Mumbai, India. She entered social work out of commitment to social justice and to bring about social change. Her passion is researching issues affecting immigrants/refugees in Canada today especially those residing in small and mid-sized urban-rural regions of Canada.  She is also interested in community-based participatory research, arts-based methods and intersectionality theory. Her dream is to advocate for more policy and programs that reduce social inequality and sustain the well-being of individuals, families, and communities. 

September Winner - Carolyn Leckie

RoL Winner Slider-CAROLYNLECKIECongratulations to Carolyn Leckie, our September researcher!

Carolyn Leckie is a Master’s of Science Candidate in the Behavioural Neuroscience area of the Psychology department. Her NSERC-funded research focused on 4-MMC (mephedrone), a potent member of the novel family of drugs that are commonly sold as ‘bath salts’.  The contents of these ‘bath salts’ are often unknown, but consistently contains that are chemical relatives of 4-MMC. Recreational  drug users in the UK and North America have been flocking to these drugs. The reported effects are extremely variable and dangerous, and have been tied to numerous deaths. Using an animal model of targeted behaviours, her research investigated these concerning effects. Results indicate that by using 4-MMC, users stand to risk the harms and associated negative repercussions of two major classes of drugs: empathogenics and psychostimulants.

2012/2013 Winners

November 2012

IMG Clarke Liz

Liz Clarke

Liz Clarke is a doctoral candidate in the English and Film Studies department. Her dissertation, “War and the Sexes: Gender in American Film, 1898-1927,” examines representations of gender and militarism in entertainment film in the context of progressive-era politics, early film exhibition practices, intended (female) audiences, and changing gender norms in society more broadly. In preparation for writing, Clarke performed research in numerous archives including the George Eastman House, Museum of Modern Art and the Library of Congress in Washington, DC, as part of the SSHRC-funded Michael Smith Foreign Studies travel grant. Her work currently advocates that archival research is necessary to understanding the history of women in film.


Serge Lokshin 

Serge Lokshin (2012-2013 Runner Up)

Serge Lokshin’s primary research interest and focus for the purposes of his master’s thesis is the comparative study of juvenile justice and trial proceedings. More specifically, he am interested in understanding the role of the courts in processing youth as well as the perpetuation of stigmas (i.e., social, cultural) that result from their interactions within the criminal justice system. His study sets out to examine both the Canadian and Russian contexts with respect to the topic of juvenile delinquency and will shed some crucial light on this issue. It is essentially a ‘compare and contrast’ study in order to understand the functions and differences in juvenile delinquency across international and legal contexts. Prior to his entry into the criminology master’s program, he attended York University in Toronto where he completed my undergraduate degree in criminology.


December 2012

Heather CurrieHeather Currie

Heather is a graduate student in the department of Education. Her recent qualitative research study, “Daughters of Single Fathers: Working as a Team”, looks at the experiences of daughters of single fathers in an urban setting. A phenomenological approach was used to look at the attributes, challenges, and needs facing daughters of single fathers. Data was gathered through in-depth interviews and later analyzed for emerging themes. Heather’s personal experience being raised by her father, for a majority of her life, motivated this research.

Heather received her BA from Ryerson University in Early Childhood Education. She further completed her BEd at Wilfrid Laurier, with a focus on primary education. Aside from her research interest in family dynamics, she is also interested in early learning, specifically within the Kindergarten environment. Heather would like to extend her gratitude to Dr. Steve Sider, from the department of Education, for his support and contribution to this research study.


January 2013

Sylvia Terzian

Sylvia Terzian

Sylvia Terzian has recently completed her PhD in the Department of English & Film Studies, and was nominated for the Gold Medal of Academic Excellence. Her primary research interests are in Postcolonial and Diaspora Literature and Theory, with a focus on contemporary Arab North-American fiction. Her dissertation, entitled “Arab Pluralities and Transnationality: ‘A Crisis of Diasporic Consciousness’ in Arab North-American Fiction,” is interdisciplinary in its engagement with historical, literary, anthropological, sociological, and cultural studies. Drawing on several intersecting theoretical models —postcolonial and diaspora studies, trauma theory, psychoanalysis, and queer theory—the dissertation addresses the implications of the experience of migration, settlement, and belonging for Arab consciousness and sense of identity in Canada and the United States. Her research focus, more broadly and comparatively considered, also extends into other literary traditions: in particular, Arabic Literature and World Anglophone Literature. Sylvia has served as a teaching assistant during her MA and PhD at Wilfrid Laurier, and more recently, has taught two senior undergraduate courses, entitled “Middle Eastern North American Narratives” and “Post-9/11 American Fiction.”


Ada Sharpe 

Ada Sharpe

Ada is a doctoral candidate in the Department of English and Film studies, currently writing her dissertation on representations of accomplishment and the decorative arts in British women’s writing of the Romantic period. Her SSHRC-funded research draws on a number of popular print forms emerging in Romantic Britain between 1780 and 1835, including the novel, verse collection, and gift book, and seeks to elucidate the ways in which literary representations of female accomplishment (such as drawing, painting, and embroidery) provide a familiar frame of reference through which women writers negotiate issues of gender.

Ada is particularly fascinated by lesser-known women novelists of the early nineteenth century, such as Mary Brunton and Amelia Opie, whose didactic fiction features some of the most virtuous, admirable, and accomplished heroines in British literary history. Ada’s research has taken her to archives in Britain and the US and enabled her to discover a wealth of bizarre and wonderful primary sources, including manuals on the decorative arts and conduct books on female amusements.


 February 2013

Amira Ragab

Amira Ragab (2012-2013 Grand Prize Winner)

Amira is a Master's student and research assistant at the Department of Mathematics. After successfully completing the graduate courses, she started her thesis work in the areas of Artificial Intelligence and Computer Vision. In particular, she has been working on the development of mathematical models for tackling the problem of automatic gesture recognition. She proposed the use of Hilbert space-filling curve for representing images of static hand gestures. Experiments on several benchmark data sets reveal the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method in comparison to the state-of-the-art methods for image-based gesture recognition. The current work will be extended to recognize dynamic gestures captured using data gloves. Amira is working under the supervision of Professor Maher Ahmed and Professor Siu-Cheung Chau, and she is the recipient of the 2012/2013 Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology (QEII-GSST).


 

Colin McLaren

Colin McLaren

Colin McLaren is a Master's student in the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, currently studying in the Group Dynamics and Physical Activity Lab with Dr. Mark Eys. His research surrounds the dynamics of youth sport teams, with a specific focus on working with volunteer house-league coaches.

Funded by a SSHRC Canada Graduate Scholarship, an Ontario Graduate Scholarship, and the Wilfrid Laurier Centennial Scholarship, Colin's current research focuses on the motivational climate in youth recreational sport, and how different ego- and task-related coaching behaviours influence perceptions of group cohesion and intentions to return to sport. Specifically, an intervention program was introduced that educated coaches to define success in terms of effort, improvement, teamwork, and cooperation as opposed to outperforming others and winning at all costs. In addition, he is also conducting a separate research project examining both the salience of roles in youth sport, and how various social and group level variables influence group processes in a competitive youth sport context.

From an applied standpoint, Colin also works with a local youth soccer organization in a consultation role where he runs workshops with rep-level coaches on topics such as teambuilding and intra-team communication, and assists in conducting house-league coach certification clinics.


 

March 2013

RolYasaman

Yasaman S. Munro

Yasaman S. Munro is currently a doctoral candidate in the Wilfrid Laurier University-University of Waterloo joint program in Religious Diversity in North America. Her SSHRC-funded research focuses on Ayurveda and associated South Asian medical traditions among Hindu South Asians now living in the Waterloo Region of Canada, many of whom are involved with the two major Hindu temples in this area. Recognizing the importance of relational networks and material culture, Yasaman asks interviewees to walk her through their everyday health practices and beliefs in domestic and religious spaces, and she traces and photographs the Ayurvedic materials people use for wellbeing. Her research has taken her to India where interviewees buy their Ayurvedic medicines and go for treatments at Ayurvedic hospitals and religious sites. More broadly, Yasaman examines how religion and social identity are linked with the ways that people respond to sickness, aging and death.


 

Zoey Jones

Zoey Jones

Zoey is a Master’s candidate in the Department of Criminology at Laurier’s Brantford campus. Her qualitative thesis, “Purchasing Sex and Negotiating Morality: An exploratory study of sex industry clients and stigma”, focuses on the lived experiences of fourteen male clients of sex workers.


This study has yielded unexpected results reflecting on the qualitative interview process itself and the researcher’s role within it. Zoey will be presenting at the Qualitatives 2013 conference in Ottawa focusing on and unpacking ethical challenges, the involvement of academic and personal identity, and the emotion work she has experienced and analyzed throughout this project.
Her research has also encountered a variety of themes including reflections of wider cultural commodification of women, definitions of sexual and non-sexual intimacy, and techniques utilized to combat broader social definitions of ‘deviant’ sexuality.
Zoey would like to thank her supervisor, Dr. Stacey Hannem, for her invaluable contribution and support.


 

April 2013

Laleh Samarbakhsh

Laleh Samarbakhsh

Laleh is a doctoral candidate in Financial Economics at the School of Business and Economics. Her dissertation, “Three Essays on Default Risk in Capital Markets,” examines the risk of bankruptcy, failure, and default in capital markets with specific focus on the recent financial crisis and distress periods. 

In her essay titled "Role of Leverage in Hedge Funds Failure", Laleh investigates the determinants of hedge fund failure during the 2008 financial crisis - why some hedge funds failed while others survived. Working on 15 years of hedge funds data, she finds that highly levered hedge funds have a higher propensity of failure during and after the crisis period.

To investigate default risk injection and its flow from one market to another, Laleh performed comprehensive empirical research using numerous financial databases including Equity Options, Credit Default Swaps, and Accounting Reports. She tests whether the default risk is priced in Equity Options and to what extent it can impact the mis-pricing of the options - a flow from fixed income market to the equity options market.

Her work has been presented at refereed Finance conferences including Financial Management Association, Eastern Finance Association and Northern Finance Association meetings.

Subcategories

  • About the Program
  • March Winner
  • February Winner


    Abdus SaburCongratulations to 
    Abdus Sabur, our February researcher!

    The theme of Sabur’s MSc research is to conduct fundamental science experiments on how organo-arsenic compounds of environmental relevance interact with reactive components in soil, particularly iron (oxyhydr)oxides.  Arsenic is released to the environment mainly from natural sources intensified by anthropogenic activities. Due to its varying toxicity, it is essential to know of its interaction with environmental surfaces for risk assessment and cleanup efforts.  The main objective was to extract kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that will aid in building accurate mathematical models to be used in predicting the fate of arsenic compounds and in designing arsenic removal technologies.  Sabur’s MSc committee concluded that he produced outstanding data from his experiments that is pushing the boundaries of knowledge in field of geochemistry.

     

  • January Winner


    RoL Winner Slider-Carolyn LeckieCongratulations to 
    Maria Liegghio, our January researcher!

    Maria is a PhD student in the Faculty of Social Work and her research is focused on the stigma of mental illness and child and youth mental health. Using a participatory research approach, Maria worked collaboratively with a group of youth diagnosed with a mental health issue to assist in three initiatives: the development of a national youth survey on stigma; an analysis of the ways young people living with a “mental illness” are portrayed in popular media; and a photo-voice project that explored what “normal” mental health was in children and youth.  As well, she interviewed parents and younger siblings about their stigma experiences as family members.  Funded by the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the results will be used to inform policy and program initiatives aimed at improving the mental health system across Canada.


  • December Winner
  • October Winner
  • September Winner
  • 2012/2013 Winners